bugs not thugs
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Awesome Camouflage is marveling at this incredible praying mantis who looks more like a collection of sticks and bits of plants than a predatory insect. This exceptionally stealthy mantis belongs to the genus Toxodera, which consists of some of the largest mantids in the world. It was discovered and photographed by Peter Houlihan in Borneo:

Amidst the dense jungles of Borneo lives quite possibly the largest mantis in the world! Yet, despite its size, it remains nearly impossible to find. Late one night, I was collecting insects in the rainforest for my research when I encountered this brilliantly cryptic mantis amongst a swarm of unaware insects. I am still not sure how I spotted it, but it is by far the most impressive mantis I have ever seen.

[via National Geographic and RACERS]

archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Awesome Camouflage is marveling at this incredible praying mantis who looks more like a collection of sticks and bits of plants than a predatory insect. This exceptionally stealthy mantis belongs to the genus Toxodera, which consists of some of the largest mantids in the world. It was discovered and photographed by Peter Houlihan in Borneo:

Amidst the dense jungles of Borneo lives quite possibly the largest mantis in the world! Yet, despite its size, it remains nearly impossible to find. Late one night, I was collecting insects in the rainforest for my research when I encountered this brilliantly cryptic mantis amongst a swarm of unaware insects. I am still not sure how I spotted it, but it is by far the most impressive mantis I have ever seen.

[via National Geographic and RACERS]

Mantisfly

buggirl:

Photo submitted by The Beauty of it all

Oh how cool is this bug?!?  It is a mantisfly.  Mantisflies are neither fly nor mantis.  But rather a relative of lacewings, antlions, and their kin.  They are predatory, and therefore, very beneficial for your garden, and the ecosystem as a whole.

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sinobug:

Katydid Nymph (Olcinia or Sathrophyllia sp., Cymatomerini, Pseudophyllinae, Tettigonidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese grasshoppers and crickets on my Flickr site HERE…..

astronomy-to-zoology:

Lucihormetica luckae
…is a unique species of “giant cockroach” (Blabridae) which has been collected around the Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador. Lucihormetica luckae is noted among cockroaches for its ability to bioluminesce via two spots on its back carapace which are inhabited by bioluminescent bacteria. It is thought that this ability evolved to mimic the appearance of the toxic click beetles of the genus Pyrophorus. It is also thought that L. luckae might be the first known species to use bioluminescence as a form of defensive mimicry.    
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Blattodea-Blaberidae-Blaverinae-Lucihormetica-L. luckae
Image: Peter Vršanský and Dušan Chorvát

astronomy-to-zoology:

Lucihormetica luckae

…is a unique species of “giant cockroach” (Blabridae) which has been collected around the Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador. Lucihormetica luckae is noted among cockroaches for its ability to bioluminesce via two spots on its back carapace which are inhabited by bioluminescent bacteria. It is thought that this ability evolved to mimic the appearance of the toxic click beetles of the genus Pyrophorus. It is also thought that L. luckae might be the first known species to use bioluminescence as a form of defensive mimicry.    

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Blattodea-Blaberidae-Blaverinae-Lucihormetica-L. luckae

Image: Peter Vršanský and Dušan Chorvát

realmonstrosities:

Jewel Catepillars!

The Dalceridae family is full of dozens of moths who start out life as colourful caterpillars that look like slugs covered in gooey, gelatinous spines that sparkle in the light.

The adults are ridiculously fluffy and like to rest with their legs splayed forward as if they’re clinging for dear life!

…Images: Gerardo Aizpuru/Andreas Kay

archiemcphee:

Put on your Ear Guards, the Department of Incredible Insects just learned about an awesome and terrifying discovery recently made in China. This monstrous creature is a member of the Megaloptera order and may be the world’s largest aquatic insect.

The specimen seen here was discovered in a mountain in Chengdu in China’s Sichuan province. Its wingspan measures 8.3 inches (21 cm) and it features a savage pair of mandibles.

Bec Crew from Scientific American explains more:

"Just as this new find is so far pretty mysterious, members of Megaloptera are also fairly poorly known. As larvae, they spend all of their time in the water, only venturing out once it’s time to pupate and become adults. While they’re usually found in clean, clear streams, rivers, swamps, ponds and lakes, they’re also perfectly capable of sustaining themselves in muddy and polluted water, which makes them extra hard to spot."

Visit io9 to learn more about this fascinating and nightmarish discovery. And please don’t go to sleep without those Ear Guards.

buggirl:

Green unicorn.
Mindo, Ecuador

buggirl:

Green unicorn.

Mindo, Ecuador

invertebrate-science:

Family Salticidae- The Jumping Spiders

The family Salticidae earned its common name, the jumping spiders, because of the ability of these spiders to leap long distances to tackle their prey. This is the largest of the spider families with about 5000 currently known species. Unlike many other spider species jumping spiders do not build elaborate webs to catch prey. Instead they use their excellent eyesight to find prey which they will then stalk until they are close enough to pounce. Many salticid spiders mimic insects in order to get close to their prey.

(Image source: 1, 2, 3, 4)

sinobug:

Mantisfly (Entanoneura sinica, Mantispidae, Neuroptera)  These extraordinary, seemingly prehistoric insects belong to the same order of insects as lacewings and owlflies. They get their name from their mantis-like appearance, as their spiny “raptorial” front legs are modified to catch small insect prey and are very similar to the front legs of mantids. The adults are predatory insects that are often nocturnal.   The larvae of the subfamily Mantispinae (to which this individual belongs) seek out female spiders or their egg sacs which they then enter; the scarabaeiform larvae then feed on the spider eggs, draining egg contents through a piercing/sucking tube formed by modified mandibles and maxillae, pupating in the egg sac. First-instar mantispids use two strategies to locate spider eggs: larvae may burrow directly through the silk of egg sacs they find, or they may board and be carried by female spiders prior to sac production, entering the sac as it is being constructed.  (attracted to MV night light)  by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

sinobug:

Mantisfly (Entanoneura sinica, Mantispidae, Neuroptera)

These extraordinary, seemingly prehistoric insects belong to the same order of insects as lacewings and owlflies. They get their name from their mantis-like appearance, as their spiny “raptorial” front legs are modified to catch small insect prey and are very similar to the front legs of mantids. The adults are predatory insects that are often nocturnal.

Mantis Fly (Entanoneura sinica, Mantispidae, Neuroptera)

The larvae of the subfamily Mantispinae (to which this individual belongs) seek out female spiders or their egg sacs which they then enter; the scarabaeiform larvae then feed on the spider eggs, draining egg contents through a piercing/sucking tube formed by modified mandibles and maxillae, pupating in the egg sac.
First-instar mantispids use two strategies to locate spider eggs: larvae may burrow directly through the silk of egg sacs they find, or they may board and be carried by female spiders prior to sac production, entering the sac as it is being constructed.

(attracted to MV night light)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……